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New Figures Confirm That Deaf Children Are Falling Behind at School

Added 12 Jun 2009

You can read more on this story by visiting the NDCS website.

Government figures, published by NDCS, show that deaf children's GCSE results continue to lag behind those of all children, and may even be falling further behind.

In 2008, just 28% of deaf children achieved five GCSEs at grades A* to C (including Engish and Maths), compared to 48% of all children.

This means that deaf children were 42% less likely than all children to achieve this milestone.

Last year, deaf children were 41% less likely - suggesting that the achievement gap has actually widened in the past year.

In all regions across England, deaf children are under achieving but the worst performing region is London, where deaf children are 50% less likely than all children to achieve five GCSEs at grades A* to C (including English and Maths).

NDCS has issued a press release highlighting our serious concerns over what the data shows. Given that deafness is not a learning disability, we do not believe there should be any achievement gap.

The press release recognises the hard work of teachers and other specialist staff in supporting deaf children and calls on local authorities to provide more funding and resources to make sure that all deaf children are able to fulfil their potential.

NDCS will use these figures to continue our Close the gap campaign for action to ensure that all deaf children are able to fulfil their potential. Last year, NDCS published the Must do better! report setting out a dozen urgent recommendations for the Government to act on.